Tag Archives: bequests

Simple: Bequests

I ended my last blog post on a cliff-hanger, saying that I would reveal what the 99% of the nonprofits without a designated planned giving officer can do to bring in planned gifts.

My first answer is to focus on bequests. My second answer is to focus on bequests. And my third answer is – stay tuned for my next post about the more sophisticated mechanisms. Continue reading

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The Big Deal About Planned Giving

For a small place, my home state of New Hampshire puts up some pretty impressive numbers.

For example, we have 424 members in our state legislature, the fourth-largest English-speaking legislative body in the world, smaller only than the U.S. Congress and the Parliaments of Great Britain and India. Given that our population is only 1.2 million (for the record, that’s 1/1000 of India’s), that means that we more or less have a representative on every block. Sometimes, two.

Similarly, this small state has over 8,400 nonprofits, of which about 1,600 are viable entities with budgets of over $100,000 and at least one paid staff member. And of these 1,600 viable nonprofits, there are fewer than a dozen that have staff members whose title includes the term “planned giving.” Continue reading

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All Bequests Are Generous; Some Can Also Be Smart

Those of you with an oil-burning furnace may be familiar with efficiency percentage tags.

If you don’t heat with fuel oil: When the oil company maintenance crew comes at the beginning of each winter to service your furnace, they leave behind a tag declaring its operating efficiency. If the tag reads 90%, you’re doing really well. If the tag reads 60%, it’s time to get a new furnace. You’re wasting a lot of fuel.

If I were to hang an efficiency tag on charitable bequests, most would be around 75% — and a few would be at 15%. Continue reading

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