Tag Archives: Aspirational Impact Funds

Better Than Endowments

[Note: This essay is based upon my presentation of the same title at the International Conference of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, delivered March 21 in Boston.]

Charitable organizations are always grateful to have endowments. But having an endowment is different from creating an endowment. Given the needs facing nonprofits today, should creating new endowments be a priority? I would argue that in many cases donors and nonprofits should create something that is far more beneficial than endowments – what I call Aspirational Impact Funds. Continue reading

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An Approach to Funding That Might Actually Work

As you may know, I’m a bit of a skeptic about the efficacy of traditional endowments. In an earlier blog post, “THIS is the Rainy Day,” I urged nonprofits with endowments to increase their spending rate in tough times and down markets, rather than following the common wisdom and lowering their annual draw (and fiscally starving themselves in the process). My point was: There are needs now. Let’s fix them. Let’s spend a bit more from the endowments today to prevent chronic problems from continuing tomorrow. And then we can then go out and raise new funds to build up our capital. Continue reading

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